From the Institute of Osteopathy – Get Active – D Murgatroyd

We all know that getting active is good for both our bodies and our minds. It can improve your mood, give you more energy, and significantly reduces your chances of serious health conditions such as dementia and certain forms of cancer.

When you visit an osteopath, they can provide advice on keeping active so you can stay healthier for longer and fend-off those aches and pains. Not sure where to begin? Osteopaths provide advice on how much physical activity you should be aiming for, how to get started and about the positive influence that physical activity can have on your health.

Find an activity you enjoy

You don’t need to spend hours in the gym if you don’t want to, find something that you enjoy instead. You will then be able to fit it into your life and sustain doing it. Gardening, dancing or a walk in the park – every little helps.

So how much is enough and what level of activity is appropriate? The guidelines differ slightly depending on your age, but everyone is advised to do some physical activity every day. This should include aerobic and strengthening exercises.

Adults aged 19 – 65 should aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity (e.g. cycling, brisk walking or pushing a lawn mower) every week, or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity (e.g. running, a game of singles tennis or using a skipping rope). Additionally, strength exercises should be done on two or more days a week. These should work all the major muscles (arms, legs, back, abdomen and chest).

If you are over 65 you should also include balancing exercises twice a week (such as yoga, Tai Chi or dancing) as this will reduce your risk of falls.

What types of activity should I do?

A mixture of moderate and vigorous intensity aerobic exercises is also acceptable. As a rule of thumb, one minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as two minutes of moderate activity. Moderate activity should leave you still able to continue a conversation without pausing for breath whereas with vigorous activity this will not be possible.

Different types of exercise and what they do

Aerobic/cardiovascular exercises: exercise that stimulates the heart and lungs to improve their function e.g. cycling, vigorous housework or mowing the lawn.

Strengthening/resistance training: this is where you are using the muscles against resistance such as lifting weights or using resistance bands or even activities that involve you resisting your own body’s weight such as sit-ups or press-ups.

Stretching/flexibility exercises: these help to loosen stiff muscles, joints, scar tissue, and helps you relax e.g. yoga or Pilates

Balance: this can help with the control of movement and ensure that muscles are ready to support the body when needed e.g. dancing, Tai Chi or yoga. This is especially beneficial for those over the age of 65.

Tips for getting started

  • It is important to build up slowly and allow your body time to get used to the new activity
  • It is normal to feel a little sore or uncomfortable after exercise, but this does tend to lessen with time
  • You are more likely to keep your new activity up if you start off with something that you enjoy, can do regularly or if you exercise with others

Remember any exercise, even a little, is better than none.

If you have been inspired to become more active but want more advice on how to get started or if an injury is stopping you, an osteopath may be able to help.

How can your osteopath help?

It is common to feel some minor discomfort after exercise as the body takes a little time to recover and adapt to the demands of your activities. Soreness often quickly resolves itself, but occasionally it may persist for more than a few days or make it difficult for you to continue your normal activities. In these instances you may want to seek advice from an osteopath.

Osteopaths are highly trained, healthcare professionals, regulated by law and recognised as one of the Allied Health Professions by NHS England. Osteopathic care is a safe and effective therapy that aims to promote the health of people, through the use of manual therapy, exercise and health advice. It is suitable for all ages, from babies to the elderly.

From the Institute of Osteopathy – Health at Work – D Murgatroyd

Are you fit for work? If your work is office or computer based, you can spend a significant portion of your day seated at a desk which can lead to a host of health problems.

Common causes of strain in the workplace include:
• Prolonged sitting at a desk
• Driving long distances
• Awkward lifting and carrying
• Overstretching
• Bending
• Extended periods of repetitive motion
• Using a computer without taking breaks

With a few changes and the addition of good habits, you can stay productive at work and remain healthy.

Sit well

It is really important when working at your desk that you are mindful of your posture and your equipment is correctly set-up.

Things to look out for include:
• Is your screen at eye level? If your monitor does not have height adjustment try elevating it with a riser, or even some old books
• Keep your mouse close. It’s easy for your mouse to drift away from you when working, make sure you are not over-stretching to reach it
• Keep your keyboard close. You should be able to sit up in your chair, have your elbows in an L-shape and still be able to reach your keyboard. If you are overstretching to reach it, you will need to make adjustments
• Adjust your chair. You should be able to sit right back into your chair, so your lower back is supported while still comfortably accessing your equipment
• Feet to the floor. The height of your chair should allow your feet to easily reach flat to the floor. Use some form of riser if needed
 • Avoid crossing your legs. It can cause circulation problems and puts unnecessary strain through your lower back.

If you are unsure about your desk or workstation set-up, ask your employers to provide a workstation assessment.

Regularly re-set your posture

While you may start off in the correct position it can be very easy to drift into a slouched position at your desk. Try putting a sticky note on your monitor as a reminder to re-set your posture every time you see it.

Take regular breaks

It is recommended that you should take a break from your desk every 30 minutes for at least one or two minutes. Try building in some of these good habits into your working day.
• Stand-up and move around for a few moments around your desk
• Take the opportunity to get a drink of water, which also helps you keep hydrated
• Rather than phoning an office colleague, can you walk over to talk to them?
• When on the phone, can you take the call standing up rather than sitting?

Laptop working

Many of us now work on laptops, particularly mobile or remote workers or those who hot-desk across offices. The same advice applies when working at a laptop, even more so if you don’t have the luxury of an adjustable chair or monitor.
• If you are mainly working on a laptop you may want to consider getting a wireless keyboard and/or risers so you can optimise your work posture.
• Also consider where you work – your dining room table may be convenient but if it is at an incorrect height, extended working may cause shoulder, neck or back pain.

Advice for physical work

If your work involves lifting or more physical activities, you need to be careful that you are not putting yourself at risk of injury or long-term health problems.
One of the biggest causes of back injury at work is due to lifting incorrectly.

Additionally, continuous repetitive activities, or staying in the same position for extended periods of time, can also lead to pain and discomfort. Being aware of how to move correctly when at work can keep you healthy for longer and keep you safe from injury.

How can your osteopath help?

Your osteopath can provide you with a fit note if you do need to take time off from work. You can discuss with your osteopath the physical impact work may have on you and agree on a course of action that may help. Along with hands-on osteopathy manual treatment, your osteopath may also offer advice on posture, lifting and workplace ergonomics.

Osteopaths are highly trained, healthcare professionals, regulated by law and recognised as one of the Allied Health Professions by NHS England. Osteopathic care is a safe and effective therapy that aims to promote the health of people, through the use of manual therapy, exercise and health advice. It is suitable for all ages, from babies to the elderly.

From the Institute of Osteopathy – Healthy Ageing and You – D Murgatroyd

It is normal for our muscles, bones, joints and associated tissues to change as we age.

Ageing does not necessarily mean that we will experience increased pain or stiffness. If you do, then treatment and advice from an osteopath can complement GP care and medicines. If you begin to notice problems, your osteopath can work with you to keep you healthier, allowing you to enjoy the pleasures of life into your later years.

Advice as you get older

Although aches and pains may be a common element of ageing, they don’t have to get in the way of your lifestyle. Here are some tips to keep you healthy and active: • Make sure you eat a healthy, varied diet • 150 minutes of exercise per week, in blocks of ten minutes or more (enough to make you warmer and breathe harder, whilst still being able to have a conversation) can help reduce the risk of circulation problems and falls. This might include activities such as dancing or brisk walking. It can also help to improve your mood and levels of confidence • Doing some form of balance exercises twice a week (for example, Tai Chi) is also recommended as you get older to help reduce the risk of falling, particularly if you are over the age of 65. Try to also include exercises that strengthen your arms, legs and body • The use of trainers or similar footwear can help absorb shocks and take the pressure off your knees, hips and spine when walking for longer periods • A short rest can help recover energy for the remainder of the day’s activities

Osteoporosis

It is estimated that around 3 million people in the UK have osteoporosis.
In this condition the usually strong support struts that make up the inside of most bones become thinner, which can lead to bones becoming fragile and breaking easily, resulting in pain and disability.
There is a lot you can do to prevent the condition, and to reduce your chance of breaking a bone if you do get it. Osteopaths are well placed to screen patients for the condition and can offer practical advice on risk factors, prevention and treatment.

Arthritis

Arthritis describes a range of over 200 different conditions that can affect bones muscles and joints all over the body, causing pain, stiffness, fatigue and difficulty performing normal daily activities. There is currently no known cure for arthritis, but that doesn’t mean that there is nothing that can be done to alleviate the consequences.

Two of the most common forms of arthritis include:

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It is a condition that affects the joints and occurs due to natural age-related changes, causing pain and stiffness. One joint may be affected in isolation or it may affect multiple joints.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition in which inflammation of the lining of the joints occurs. This causes pain, stiffness and swelling. Other symptoms may include, fatigue, flu-like symptoms and anaemia.

Managing arthritis

The most important thing you can do if you have arthritis is to eat a well-balanced diet full of vitamins and minerals and keep to a healthy weight.
Exercise can be very helpful for the symptoms of arthritis.
Most people with arthritis will have been prescribed tablets for their symptoms. In some cases, joint replacement surgery may also become an option but will not be required by everyone living with arthritis.
There are many different types of gadgets and aids available in shops and on the internet that can help you to maintain your independence and manage daily tasks.
Some people find that their symptoms get worse if they do too much of a certain activity. This is known as a flare-up. Pacing your activities (breaking tasks down into smaller manageable chunks and resting in between) can help. Arthritis can affect your mood and emotions. Some people find that socialising, positive thinking and relaxation can help.

How can your osteopath help?

Many people find it helpful to talk to an osteopath about ways of keeping active, preventing common problems such as falls and managing conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatic pain and osteoporosis. Osteopaths are highly trained, healthcare professionals, regulated by law and recognised as one of the Allied Health Professions by NHS England. Osteopathic care is a safe and effective therapy that aims to promote the health of people, through the use of manual therapy, exercise and health advice. It is suitable for all ages, from babies to the elderly.

Damon Murgatroyd – From the Institute of Osteopathy – Healthy Eating 

Eating healthily has both mental and physical benefits. It is one of the best things you can do to prevent and control health problems such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet can make you look and feel better, raise your energy levels and increase your sense of general well-being. Variety is the spice of life and we should aim to eat a wide range of foods from the five major food groups.

Carbohydrates
These are starchy foods like bread, potatoes, pasta and rice and should make up the main part of every meal. Carbohydrates provide the body with energy, calcium and B vitamins.

Protein
Meat, fish and eggs as well as nuts, beans, peas, lentils and soya all contain protein. We should have two or three servings of protein every day. Protein is essential for the body to grow and repair itself and provides a range of vitamins, iron and other minerals.

Fruit and vegetables
Eat a wide variety of at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. They contain vitamins, fibre and antioxidants which can prevent some cancers. Fibre keeps your digestive system healthy and makes you feel full which can help control your weight.

Dairy
We should try to eat three servings of milk, yoghurt and/or cheese each day. Dairy products contain protein and calcium, vitamins A, D and B12 and keep your bones and teeth healthy.

Fats and oils
Unsaturated fats like olive oil and sunflower oil are good for the body. These fats usually come from vegetables or nuts and are liquid at room temperature. Saturated fats like butter and lard usually come from animals and are often solid at room temperature. Use fats and oils sparingly.

Fluids
Water, skimmed or semi-skimmed milk are the best choices as they contain no sugar. Unsweetened tea and coffee are also good choices. Aim for six to eight glasses a day and check the colour of your urine. It should be a light yellow colour – if it is dark yellow you may need to drink more fluids.

Limit sugar, salt and fat
Sugar can contribute to weight gain. This increases your risk of health problems such as heart disease, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. Sugar also contributes to tooth decay and has no nutritional value apart from providing energy. Fats can raise your cholesterol, which increases the risk of heart disease. Current advice is to cut down on all fats and replace saturated fat with some unsaturated fat. Salt can cause raised blood pressure, which can increase your risk of heart disease and a stroke. Don’t add salt to your food automatically – taste it first.

How can your osteopath help?

Your osteopath can give you information about things you can do yourself to help improve or maintain your own health and wellbeing. This may include things like eating a healthy diet and exercise. Osteopaths are highly trained, healthcare professionals, experts in the musculoskeletal system (joints, muscles and associated tissues) and its relationship to other systems of the body. Osteopathic care is based on the individual needs of the patient and so varies depending on your age, fitness levels and diagnosis.

low back pain best osteopathic tips from Dr Damon Murgatroyd

Low Back Pain – Best advice to stop it and to prevent it recurring, from an expert osteopath

Fear of Low Back Pain…. and fear of it coming back. I’m always humbled with respect for my patients who describe how this sits in their mind, causing him or her to reduce the number of things that they dare do in life. It means that enjoyment of leisure time, family events, sport and hobbies are all curtailed. Life, as it was once known, is lived in a box.

Your Osteopath can help – both for now and for the future.

AND THIS IS THE IMPORTANT POINT. Osteopathy is a Whole-body and Whole-life approach. Sure, we are very (very) good at ‘freeing up’ joints’ – but what then? A really good therapist will always want to give you the tools to get on top of the problem – yourself

Would you like ‘Therapy’, or ‘Personal Care’?

There has been a vogue, particularly in London, for NON-osteopath therapists to have lunchtime walk-in clinics. You turn up, lie down, have some kneeding from a big guy, then a clicker comes in and does 3 thrusts, at the neck , thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. Then you pay and go back to work.

Ok – so this in/out approach suits some busy people, particularly if they have no time to engage with the problem that is developing.
I suggest get value from your visit. See an Osteopath. Discuss fears and ambitions. Talk about where you would like to be with your spine in 1, 3, 5 years from now.
Formulate a plan that you take with you on the journey to having an active, fun life!

Beat low back pain

Osteopath Dr Damon Murgatroyd advises on how you can best prevent low back pain
www.spineandjoints.co.uk

Here are my Top 10 Tips for you to Beat Your Own Low Back Pain!

Firstly, for when your back is actually in a Bad Phase.

This is a MULTI-MODAL APPROACH. Work in conjunction with your Osteopath. He/she will test for underlying conditions, assess your body and provide some early pain relief. The next few days are critical for allowing the body’s natural healing processes to occur. Dr Damon Murgatroyd will often suggest during this time:

  1. Allow time for it to settle. Often 12-24 hours of reduced stress and commitment to do things is enough.
  2. Analgesics (pain-killers) as appropriate. Pain, who needs pain? With lowered pain, spasm and misery reduce, you get a better night’s sleep and wake up more refreshed.
  3. ‘Artful Resting’ – My term for having the balance right between being on the move, and pausing to reduce mechanical stresses. The now classic advice of ‘keep on the move’ is unsophisticated. You are allowed to potter about for a while, then sit, prop or lie down off and on. Just don’t spend all day in bed!
  4. Keep your exercises appropriate to the stage of recovery you are at. Do not try to beat the pain into submission! Your Osteopath is well-placed to give information on this.
  5. Be honest, not brave. Tell your partner, family, boss and work colleagues that you are suffering – and elicit their help and support. This kind of assistance from those around you can often allow for quicker healing. The converse is that you plough on, become worse, and then are off sick – which those around you definitely don’t want.

    Secondly, there is that time BETWEEN bad phases

  6. Variety of activity is good – particularly as the last of the Bad Phase is settling. By this I mean that movements and exercises should include lots of different directions of bend and stretch. Probably 90% of everything we do at home and at work (think of child- caring and desk posture) is in one main direction – bent forward. Where are the side-bends, extensions (backward actions) and rotations? Our bodies adapt to what we ask of them, so re-condition to include all of these forgotten actions.
  7. Build up general fitness over weeks to months. People have different degrees of starting fitness, but if you’ve been hampered by low back pain for months or even years, your body will take time to acclimatise.
  8.  Find something ‘sporty’ that you actually like to do. Some prefer land based, others to be in the water. Some operate best solo, others with a friend/buddy, and others in a group. Another consideration is whether you relate best to one-to-one coaching, a team leader, or self-directed such as from the internet or a DVD. Dance, Pilates, Tai-Chi, Yoga and Wii-Fit (remember them?) all count. Walking is very 2-dimensional – see the point above about variety – its not forbidden, but add it to your once or twice a week general sporting interest.
  9. The uk government physical activity guidelines suggests: Adults, Guidelines 16-64 year olds, should aim to be active daily. Over a week, activity should add up to at least 150 minutes (2½ hours) of moderate intensity activity in bouts of 10 minutes or more – one way to approach this is to do 30 minutes on at least 5 days a week.
  10. My take on that last point is, that for busy people, to have a routine of one ‘Premier Activity’ eg group session/class per week, and 2 or 3 lesser demand activities per week such as walking or cycling. Add in more as you gain confidence. The good thing is that YOU have control.

There are many variations of how your personal lumbar pain expresses itself. It can be associated with referred pain – into the buttock or leg – but not all such discomfort is due to a classic disc protrusion. Repeated strain to soft tissues in the lower back can mimic elements of sciatica, and this is called ‘mechanical’, or ‘non-radicular’ pain. This mechanical pain is eminently treatable by a registered osteopath, supported by self-management principles outlined above.

I feel confident that this list of 10 suggestions for looking after your lumbar pain will not be a million miles away from how you would want to keep on top of things yourself. Merely I have rationalized the approach as a doctor who has developed a special interest in spine and joint care. I am amazed at how much Osteopathy has to offer patients who wish to work as a collaborator in their management plan.

Osteopaths are trained in dealing with musculo-skeletal problems of many types. You do not need to see your GP before booking. However, we do work closely with our GP colleagues who, in an holistic sense, are the bedrock of you and your family’s general health. If you do have any concerns about your the state of your spine it is entirely appropriate to discuss it with both your GP and your osteopath.

Please – visit me, Dr Damon Murgatroyd. I’ve had 25-30 years of experience as both an Osteopath, technique tutor, family doctor, and have worked in hospital rheumatology and orthopaedic clinics. I have medical Diplomas in Musculo-Skeletal Medicine and Care of the Elderly. In addition, I have active involvement in Music and Performance Arts.

low back pain best osteopathic tips from Dr Damon Murgatroyd

Low Back Pain – Best advice to stop it and to prevent it recurring, from an expert osteopath

Fear of Low Back Pain…. and fear of it coming back. I’m always humbled with respect for my patients who describe how this sits in their mind, causing him or her to reduce the number of things that they dare do in life. It means that enjoyment of leisure time, family events, sport and hobbies are all curtailed. Life, as it was once known, is lived in a box.

Your Osteopath can help – both for now and for the future.

AND THIS IS THE IMPORTANT POINT. Osteopathy is a Whole-body and Whole-life approach. Sure, we are very (very) good at ‘freeing up’ joints’ – but what then? A really good therapist will always want to give you the tools to get on top of the problem – yourself

Would you like ‘Therapy’, or ‘Personal Care’?

There has been a vogue, particularly in London, for NON-osteopath therapists to have lunchtime walk-in clinics. You turn up, lie down, have some kneeding from a big guy, then a clicker comes in and does 3 thrusts, at the neck , thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. Then you pay and go back to work.

Ok – so this in/out approach suits some busy people, particularly if they have no time to engage with the problem that is developing.
I suggest get value from your visit. See an Osteopath. Discuss fears and ambitions. Talk about where you would like to be with your spine in 1, 3, 5 years from now.
Formulate a plan that you take with you on the journey to having an active, fun life!

Beat low back pain

Osteopath Dr Damon Murgatroyd advises on how you can best prevent low back pain
www.spineandjoints.co.uk

Here are my Top 10 Tips for you to Beat Your Own Low Back Pain!

Firstly, for when your back is actually in a Bad Phase.

This is a MULTI-MODAL APPROACH. Work in conjunction with your Osteopath. He/she will test for underlying conditions, assess your body and provide some early pain relief. The next few days are critical for allowing the body’s natural healing processes to occur. Dr Damon Murgatroyd will often suggest during this time:

  1. Allow time for it to settle. Often 12-24 hours of reduced stress and commitment to do things is enough.
  2. Analgesics (pain-killers) as appropriate. Pain, who needs pain? With lowered pain, spasm and misery reduce, you get a better night’s sleep and wake up more refreshed.
  3. ‘Artful Resting’ – My term for having the balance right between being on the move, and pausing to reduce mechanical stresses. The now classic advice of ‘keep on the move’ is unsophisticated. You are allowed to potter about for a while, then sit, prop or lie down off and on. Just don’t spend all day in bed!
  4. Keep your exercises appropriate to the stage of recovery you are at. Do not try to beat the pain into submission! Your Osteopath is well-placed to give information on this.
  5. Be honest, not brave. Tell your partner, family, boss and work colleagues that you are suffering – and elicit their help and support. This kind of assistance from those around you can often allow for quicker healing. The converse is that you plough on, become worse, and then are off sick – which those around you definitely don’t want.

    Secondly, there is that time BETWEEN bad phases

  6. Variety of activity is good – particularly as the last of the Bad Phase is settling. By this I mean that movements and exercises should include lots of different directions of bend and stretch. Probably 90% of everything we do at home and at work (think of child- caring and desk posture) is in one main direction – bent forward. Where are the side-bends, extensions (backward actions) and rotations? Our bodies adapt to what we ask of them, so re-condition to include all of these forgotten actions.
  7. Build up general fitness over weeks to months. People have different degrees of starting fitness, but if you’ve been hampered by low back pain for months or even years, your body will take time to acclimatise.
  8.  Find something ‘sporty’ that you actually like to do. Some prefer land based, others to be in the water. Some operate best solo, others with a friend/buddy, and others in a group. Another consideration is whether you relate best to one-to-one coaching, a team leader, or self-directed such as from the internet or a DVD. Dance, Pilates, Tai-Chi, Yoga and Wii-Fit (remember them?) all count. Walking is very 2-dimensional – see the point above about variety – its not forbidden, but add it to your once or twice a week general sporting interest.
  9. The uk government physical activity guidelines suggests: Adults, Guidelines 16-64 year olds, should aim to be active daily. Over a week, activity should add up to at least 150 minutes (2½ hours) of moderate intensity activity in bouts of 10 minutes or more – one way to approach this is to do 30 minutes on at least 5 days a week.
  10. My take on that last point is, that for busy people, to have a routine of one ‘Premier Activity’ eg group session/class per week, and 2 or 3 lesser demand activities per week such as walking or cycling. Add in more as you gain confidence. The good thing is that YOU have control.

There are many variations of how your personal lumbar pain expresses itself. It can be associated with referred pain – into the buttock or leg – but not all such discomfort is due to a classic disc protrusion. Repeated strain to soft tissues in the lower back can mimic elements of sciatica, and this is called ‘mechanical’, or ‘non-radicular’ pain. This mechanical pain is eminently treatable by a registered osteopath, supported by self-management principles outlined above.

I feel confident that this list of 10 suggestions for looking after your lumbar pain will not be a million miles away from how you would want to keep on top of things yourself. Merely I have rationalized the approach as a doctor who has developed a special interest in spine and joint care. I am amazed at how much Osteopathy has to offer patients who wish to work as a collaborator in their management plan.

Osteopaths are trained in dealing with musculo-skeletal problems of many types. You do not need to see your GP before booking. However, we do work closely with our GP colleagues who, in an holistic sense, are the bedrock of you and your family’s general health. If you do have any concerns about your the state of your spine it is entirely appropriate to discuss it with both your GP and your osteopath.

Please – visit me, Dr Damon Murgatroyd. I’ve had 25-30 years of experience as both an Osteopath, technique tutor, family doctor, and have worked in hospital rheumatology and orthopaedic clinics. I have medical Diplomas in Musculo-Skeletal Medicine and Care of the Elderly. In addition, I have active involvement in Music and Performance Arts.

Things to Consider on That Ski Holiday

Skiing is a great activity all the family can enjoy, as I know from personal experience with my own children. Before long, they can be racing down red runs, leaving their more cautious parents behind! As a knee surgeon, I regularly see children (and adults) who have torn their ACL whilst skiing and need an operation to repair their knee, which I do using minimally invasive treatments I have helped to pioneer. However, these injuries are relatively rare, and luckily can be treated quickly and effectively to allow children to get back to their usual activities in a matter of months, and hopefully skiing in due course.

Preparation for a child’s first ski holiday
Whilst children don’t need to train before skiing in the same way as an adult, do make sure your child is in good physical condition. Skiing and snowboarding are strenuous sports that put heavy demands on muscles, tendons and ligaments in many parts of the body.

It is a really good idea to take them to a dry ski slope or indoor snow centre for a few lessons, so they get the feel of the boots and skis so know what to expect.

Make sure you enrol them in a good ski school, which is invaluable to help them gain confidence and progress on the snow. Instructors can educate beginners on the importance of a good warm-up and cool-down, properly fitted equipment, and safe skiing techniques.

Don’t be tempted to overdo things on the first few days. Injuries often occur when children are tired. Skiing uses different muscles to other sports and children’s bodies they need a chance to rest after ski school.

Once they have progressed from the nursery slopes and you start skiing as a family, make sure your children avoid terrain that is beyond their ability and have routine rest breaks with rehydration and snacks. It is also important to teach your children about the danger of going too fast on skis and about sticking to the pisted areas.

Make sure your child knows how to handle a fall. Skiing and snowboarding injuries commonly occur when you try to avoid a fall or brace yourself against a fall.

More experienced skiers
Always start the day with some stretching exercises and take a few warm-up runs on gentle terrain before moving to steeper slopes.

As children progress and, as I’ve found, overtake their parents in speed and ability, don’t be tempted to let them ski or snowboard alone. Do make sure they have a piste map and are familiar with the ski area and the terrain in case you get split up.

Make sure your children ski and snowboard only in areas matching their ability. Skiers and snowboarders get hurt when they are going too fast and lose control.

Ensure they drink plenty of fluids and eat nutritious food throughout the day and encourage them to take breaks and to stop when they get tired.

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Working from home meant we could vary snack and coffee breaks, change our desks or view, goof off, drink on the job, even spend the day in pajamas, and often meet to gossip or share ideas. On the other hand, we bossed ourselves around, set impossible goals, and demanded longer hours than office jobs usually entail. It was the ultimate “flextime,” in that it depended on how flexible we felt each day, given deadlines, distractions, and workaholic crescendos.
Aristotle made several efforts to explain how moral conduct contributes to the good life for human agents, including the Eqikh EudaimonhV and the Magna Moralia, but the most complete surviving statement of his views on morality occurs in the Eqikh Nikomacoi .

Successful people ask better questions.

But on Aristotle’s view, the lives of individual human beings are invariably linked together in a social context. In the Peri PoliV he speculated about the origins of the state, described and assessed the relative merits of various types of government, and listed the obligations of the individual citizen.

Luctus fermentum commodo

Working from home meant we could vary snack and coffee breaks, change our desks or view, goof off, drink on the job, even spend the day in pajamas, and often meet to gossip or share ideas. On the other hand, we bossed ourselves around, set impossible goals, and demanded longer hours than office jobs usually entail. It was the ultimate “flextime,” in that it depended on how flexible we felt each day, given deadlines, distractions, and workaholic crescendos.

This is Photoshop’s version of Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet. Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit.

Integer vel libero arcu, egestas tempor ipsum. Vestibulum id dolor aliquet dolor fringilla ornare. Nunc non massa erat. Vivamus odio sem, rhoncus vel bibendum vitae, euismod a urna. Aliquam erat volutpat. Aenean non lorem arcu. Phasellus in neque nulla, sed sodales ipsum. Morbi a massa sed sapien vulputate lacinia. Vivamus et urna vitae felis malesuada aliquet sit amet et metus.

  • Consectetur adipiscing elit vtae elit libero
  • Nullam id dolor id eget lacinia odio posuere erat a ante
  • Integer posuere erat dapibus posuere velit

There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable.

This is Photoshop’s version of Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet.
Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit.
Duis sed odio sit amet nibh vulputate cursus a sit amet mauris. Morbi accumsan ipsum velit. Nam nec tellus a odio tincidunt auctor a ornare odio. Sed non mauris vitae erat consequat auctor eu in elit.

If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Aenean non enim ut enim fringilla adipiscing id in lorem. Quisque aliquet neque vitae lectus tempus consectetur. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nunc eu nibh nulla, id cursus arcu.

Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae;
Nam at velit nisl. Aenean vitae est nisl. Cras molestie molestie nisl vel imperdiet. Donec vel mi sem.

Working from home meant we could vary snack and coffee breaks, change our desks or view, goof off, drink on the job, even spend the day in pajamas, and often meet to gossip or share ideas. On the other hand, we bossed ourselves around, set impossible goals, and demanded longer hours than office jobs usually entail. It was the ultimate “flextime,” in that it depended on how flexible we felt each day, given deadlines, distractions, and workaholic crescendos.
Aristotle made several efforts to explain how moral conduct contributes to the good life for human agents, including the Eqikh EudaimonhV and the Magna Moralia, but the most complete surviving statement of his views on morality occurs in the Eqikh Nikomacoi .

Successful people ask better questions.

But on Aristotle’s view, the lives of individual human beings are invariably linked together in a social context. In the Peri PoliV he speculated about the origins of the state, described and assessed the relative merits of various types of government, and listed the obligations of the individual citizen.

Luctus fermentum commodo

Working from home meant we could vary snack and coffee breaks, change our desks or view, goof off, drink on the job, even spend the day in pajamas, and often meet to gossip or share ideas. On the other hand, we bossed ourselves around, set impossible goals, and demanded longer hours than office jobs usually entail. It was the ultimate “flextime,” in that it depended on how flexible we felt each day, given deadlines, distractions, and workaholic crescendos.

This is Photoshop’s version of Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet. Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit.

Integer vel libero arcu, egestas tempor ipsum. Vestibulum id dolor aliquet dolor fringilla ornare. Nunc non massa erat. Vivamus odio sem, rhoncus vel bibendum vitae, euismod a urna. Aliquam erat volutpat. Aenean non lorem arcu. Phasellus in neque nulla, sed sodales ipsum. Morbi a massa sed sapien vulputate lacinia. Vivamus et urna vitae felis malesuada aliquet sit amet et metus.

  • Consectetur adipiscing elit vtae elit libero
  • Nullam id dolor id eget lacinia odio posuere erat a ante
  • Integer posuere erat dapibus posuere velit

There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don’t look even slightly believable.

This is Photoshop’s version of Lorem Ipsum. Proin gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliquet.
Aenean sollicitudin, lorem quis bibendum auctor, nisi elit consequat ipsum, nec sagittis sem nibh id elit.
Duis sed odio sit amet nibh vulputate cursus a sit amet mauris. Morbi accumsan ipsum velit. Nam nec tellus a odio tincidunt auctor a ornare odio. Sed non mauris vitae erat consequat auctor eu in elit.

If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn’t anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Aenean non enim ut enim fringilla adipiscing id in lorem. Quisque aliquet neque vitae lectus tempus consectetur. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nunc eu nibh nulla, id cursus arcu.

Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae;
Nam at velit nisl. Aenean vitae est nisl. Cras molestie molestie nisl vel imperdiet. Donec vel mi sem.

For Bournemouth Clinic Call        01202 300903

For Southampton Clinic Call        023 8023 2721